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The Measure of Everyday Life

“The Measure of Everyday Life” is a weekly interview program, hosted by Dr. Brian Southwell, featuring social science researchers who endeavor to improve the human condition. Independent Weekly has called the show ‘unexpected’ and ‘diverse’ and notes that the show ‘brings big questions to radio.' Episodes air each Sunday night from 6:30 – 7 p.m. in the Durham listening area and a podcast of each show is available online the Wednesday following the original airing. The show is made possible by RTI International. Have thoughts on the show? Let your voice be heard by rating us. You can also join the conversation on Twitter by following @MeasureRadio.
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Now displaying: May, 2017
May 24, 2017

Scientific communities are pivotal in the advancement of society through technology, medicine, and new knowledge. But where do large honor societies fit in scientific communities? How do they help shape science policy? Jamie Vernon and John Nemeth of SIGMA Xi discuss the important role honors societies play in the world.

May 17, 2017

The ability to read and understand words is immensely powerful. Yet, many societies around the world have a high percentage of adults who can't read. How do we improve global literacy rates? Jennae Bulat shares lessons learned about international literacy education through her work at RTI International.

May 10, 2017

Communities have the power to enrich and better the life of people, but community groups often don't use the resources that exist around them. Why is that? How can we bridge the gap between research and community action? In this episode, Jennifer Bowles and John Killeen discuss the many ways institutions can step up to support community organizations. 

 

May 3, 2017

We've come to a point where the word "surveys" no longer triggers images of someone walking door-to-door interviewing people. Cell phones, tablets, and other devices are changing the ways surveys are conducted, though researchers are still discovering the best ways to ask questions. In this episode, the authors of Usability Testing for Survey Research discuss how to improve the ways we ask questions through survey research.

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