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“The Measure of Everyday Life” is a weekly public radio program featuring researchers, practitioners, and professionals discussing their work to improve the human condition. Independent Weekly has called the show ‘unexpected’ and ‘diverse’ and notes that the show ‘brings big questions to radio.'

Episodes air Sunday nights at 6:30 PM EST in the Raleigh-Durham, NC, media market (and also are streamed internationally through WNCU) and are available online the Wednesday following the original airing. WNCU produces the show with major underwriting from the nonprofit RTI International.

Have thoughts on what we are doing? Let your voice be heard by rating us and joining the conversation on Twitter by following @MeasureRadio or find us on Facebook and Instagram. For more information, see measureradio.net.

[Photo: J. Bowman]

Oct 13, 2021

Protecting our watersheds in the future will involve shaping human behavior among other efforts. On this episode, we continue our exploration of water as a consideration for social science through a conversation with Chelsea McGimpsey, water resources planner for the County of San Diego.


Oct 6, 2021

Water is a life-giving force and yet managing its uncertainty also is a major challenge for us in the 21st century. On this episode, we talk with water resources engineer Jonathan Quebbeman about public understanding of water management and society.

 


Sep 29, 2021

Who was the first person to cross the Pacific Ocean and return? Why don't we know the history of Pacific navigation to the same extent we know Atlantic history? On this episode, we talk with Andrés Reséndez, the author of Conquering the Pacific: An Unknown Mariner and the Final Great Voyage of the Age of Discovery.


Sep 22, 2021

How can photography offer testaments of social movements? On this episode, we talk with Veronica Chambers, editor for narrative projects for The New York Times and author (with Jennifer Harlan) of Call and Response: The Story of Black Lives Matter, a visual accounting of the movement and responses to the movement.


Sep 1, 2021

Population growth in the U.S. has slowed to its lowest rate since the 1930s according to recent Census data. How should we think about changes in our population size? On this episode, we talk with John Seager, who has written a book on population dynamics and is president and CEO of the nonprofit organization Population...